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The vaccine against swine flu in pregnant women

The vaccine against swine flu in pregnant women


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The swine flu vaccine is also indicated for pregnant women and babies over 6 months. For pregnant women, many organizations recommend both influenza vaccines: seasonal influenza and swine flu.
If the baby is not yet old enough to get the vaccine, preventive measures are recommended, especially if his mother is already ill.
The vaccine against swine flu, beneficial for pregnant women
Why both vaccines? Because, if the pregnancy contacts either of the two types of influenza, there are high chances of complications such as pneumonia or preterm birth, which could endanger both the mother's life and that of the fetus.
One of the vaccines provides protection against seasonal influenza, which occurs every year, the other vaccine protects against the A (H1N1) virus, which has a different strain from the seasonal influenza virus. In the US, of the fatal cases of swine flu, 6% were pregnant women, although they represent 1% of the population.
It has been shown that administering the seasonal influenza vaccine during pregnancy gives the baby protection after birth, which is valid, it seems, in the case of the swine flu vaccine. This is important, because newborns who get the flu are particularly prone to serious complications, and the vaccine cannot be given until they are 6 months old.
Some doctors believe that the vaccine is not indicated in the first trimester of pregnancy. After the first trimester of pregnancy or before 4 weeks of becoming pregnant, the flu vaccine is considered not to be harmful, but even beneficial to your health and to your baby or to a subsequent pregnancy. For more advice, consult an obstetrician.
There is two types of swine flu vaccine:
• Injectable, containing the inactivated (killed) virus, such as seasonal flu,
• Nasal spray, which contains the active (live) virus and is not recommended for pregnant women.
Because the risk of disease is higher in pregnant women, they have priority over vaccination. Don't forget to mention that you are expecting a baby!
However, there are some situations in which you should not get vaccinated:
• If you are ill and have a fever, wait until the symptoms have passed and then only get your vaccines.
• If you are allergic to eggs or have had severe allergies to any flu vaccine.
• If you have ever had Guillan-Barre syndrome, tell this to your specialist staff to evaluate the relationship between the risks and benefits of a flu vaccine in this case.
Vaccine preservatives, a cause for concern for mothers
Some future moms are worried about the preservative Thimerosal, used in some flu vaccines. However, no evidence has been found to support the theory that it would have harmful effects, and experts say the benefits of the vaccine outweigh any risk that this preservative could bring.
There are also influenza vaccines without Thimerosal, but they are not easy to find.
There is no treatment for swine flu, only vaccination is a healing solution.